Social Media

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  • Learn how to harness common social media platforms—such as Twitter, Facebook, Google, YouTube, and Flickr—to accelerate student learning.

Social Media

Learn how to harness common social media platforms—such as Twitter, Facebook, Google, YouTube, and Flickr—to accelerate student learning.

course

Learn how to harness common social media platforms—such as Twitter, Facebook, Google, YouTube, and Flickr—to accelerate student learning.

  • Moving from social networking to "social netlearning"
  • Balancing social media with in-class activities
  • Creating social media guidelines
  • Using Twitter for polls
  • Using Facebook for student-generated test questions
  • Connecting to real-world scenarios and people
  • Using ReadWriteThink and Facebook to construct timelines
  • Using Flickr and YouTube to collect student fieldwork
  • Showcasing student work in online portfolios
  • 1.2 Welcome
  • 1.3 What should you know before watching this course
  • 1.4 Using exercise files
  • 2.2 Moving from social media to social net learning
  • 2.3 Learning as a social activity
  • 2.4 Getting social: Social media, social networking, and other social tools
  • 2.5 Balancing social media use with traditional strategies
  • 2.6 Deciding whether or not to use social media with your class
  • 2.7 Creating guidelines for learning with social media in your class
  • 2.8 Guiding lines in "identity management"
  • 2.9 Ensuring equity when using social media with your class
  • 3.2 Looking at social media
  • 3.3 Using Twitter as a class "backchannel" during lectures
  • 3.4 Using Twitter and Google jockey to augment lectures
  • 3.5 Using Twitter polls during lectures
  • 3.6 Using TodaysMeet or GoReact to facilitate in-class feed back for student presentations
  • 3.7 Using Twitter or Facebook for collaborative learning activities
  • 3.8 Classroom assessment technique: Using Twitter for one-minute paper
  • 3.9 Classroom assessment technique: Using Facebook for the student-generated test questions
  • 4.2 Looking at social media outside the classroom
  • 4.3 Using Twitter, Facebook, or social reading tools to discuss class readings
  • 4.4 Using Twitter, Facebook, or Diigo to connect to real word scenarios and people
  • 4.5 Using Diigo, Google Docs, and Voice Thread for small group projects
  • 4.6 Using Twitter or Facebook for writing-to-learn assignments
  • 4.7 Using ReadWriteThink or Facebook to construct timelines
  • 4.8 Using Flickr or Youtube to collect student field work
  • 4.9 Using Pinterest, blogs, or Pathbrite portfolios to showcase student work
  • 5.2 Key takeaways